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Local food resources

The Putting Down Roots Sustainability Salons have continued each month.  The second Sustainability Salon (as well as the 14th15th, 26th27th, 38th, & 39th) focused on food -- growing it, sourcing it locally, and eating more humanely.  Afterwards, Maren put together a list of many such local sources:  CSA farms, farmers' markets, grassfed and humanely raised meats and dairy, natural foods suppliers, bakeries, and advocacy organizations.  This list now resides on a growing Resources section of the Putting Down Roots Blogger site.

Dec 3: Sustainability Salon on Visualizing Air Quality

For the 59th Sustainability Salon, we'll have our annual fall focus on Air Quality, this time with an amazing opportunity to share the images, words, and experiences that were part of the recent photography exhibit In The Air: Visualizing What We Breathe.  We'll hear from the curators, photographers, and writer about the creation of this collaborative visual compendium.
Salons run 3-10 p.m. at Maren's house in Squirrel Hill.  Please don't arrive before 3 p.m.  We usually aim to start the program sometime around 4, after folks have had a chance to meet, mingle, and tour around an interesting and productive urban permaculture site -- but this time there is no program, so come hang out!.   Please email me (at maren dot cooke at gmail dot com) with salon in the Subject line to RSVP (yes or maybe), or click on the link in your EventBrite invitation (if you're not already on my list, please email me to be added!).  
July's salon with Bill Peduto
Please RSVP each time -- it helps greatly in several ways.  Among other things, attendance varies widely, and these events have been so successful that we need to begin limiting attendance.  So RSVP early if you can, to ensure your participation!  The free virtual "tickets" on Eventbrite may run out (you don't need to print any tickets, by the way, just be on the list).  Also, weather and such can be unpredictable and it's good to know who to contact if there's a change -- and I'll send directions and/or a trail map if you need 'em on Friday or Saturday.  Be sure to include salon in the Subject line, as I receive a ridiculous amount of email every day.  And if you're new, please let me know how you heard about the Salons!
Bring food and/or drink to share if you can, along with musical instruments if you play.  Check back on MarensList (where you can find information on all sorts of environmental and social justice events) for updates.  And if you aren't yet on my list, if you're interested in Sustainability Salons (and our occasional house concert, simply contact me and I'll put you on my email list.  

As always, I'll be sending out directions and such, and any late-breaking info, to all the RSVP'd folks by the morning of the salon if not before.  So if you don't have it yet, please be patient!  One of these days I'll streamline this process a bit, but for now it takes a while to to dot all my i's and cross all my t's.  (All the extraneous requests for the address don't help;  I have lots of other stuff I send out with it, but don't like to let them go unanswered so it adds hours to my prep time.  If you RSVP properly (see above), you should get the info by the morning of the salon!)
For the uninitiated, a Sustainability Salon is an educational forum;  a venue for discussion and debate about important environmental issues;  it's a house party with an environmental theme.  We usually have featured speakers on various aspects of a topic, interspersed with stimulating conversation, lively debate, delectable potluck food and drink, and music-making through the evening.

Past topics have included the City of Pittsburgh's sustainability initiativesfossil energy infrastructure, getting money out of politicscommunity solar power and the Solarize Allegheny program, the Paris climate negotiations (beforeduring, and after), air quality (again, with news on the autism connection), reuse (of things and substances), neighborhood-scale food systems, other forms of green community revitalizationsolar powerclimate changeenvironmental art, environmental education (Part I & Part II), community mapping projectsenvironmental journalismgrassroots actionMarcellus shale development and community rightsgreen buildingair qualityhealth care, more solar powertrees and park stewardshipalternative energy and climate policyregional watershed issues, fantastic film screenings and discussions (often led by filmmakers) over the winter with Rachel Carson and the Power Of One VoiceTriple Divide on fracking, You've Been Trumped and A Dangerous GameA Fierce Green FireSustainability Pioneersfilms on consumptionLiving DownstreamBidder 70YERTGas Rush Stories, and foodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodand more food (a recurrent theme;  with California running out of water, we'd better gear up to produce a lot more of our own!).
Quite a few people have asked me what sorts of food to bring -- and my answer, as always, is whatever inspires you;  I believe in the "luck" part of potlucks.  Tasty noshings for the afternoon, hearty main dishes or scrumptious salads and sides for dinner, baked goods from biscuits and breads to brownies or baklava -- and/or beverages of any kind:  wine, beer, hard or sweet cider (the latter we can mull if you like), juice, tea, whatever.  The more the merrier!  Local fare is always particularly welcome, whether homegrown or boughten.  Dishes containing meat or dairy are fine, though if it isn't really obvious please make a note of it.  

If you haven't been here before, you may enjoy checking out our roof garden and solar installation (and now apiary!) as well as the many other green and interesting things around our place.  

And if you like to make music or listen to homemade music, don't forget the evening sing -- we typically run the gamut from Irish fiddle tunes to protest songs to the Beatles, and a fun time is had by all.  Bring instruments if you play, and/or pick up one of ours.  Conversations will continue through the evening, as well. 

Nov 12: The Just Transition

Following last month's session on Environmental Justice, the 58th Sustainability Salon will narrow our focus to the Just Transition:  making sure that, as society shifts from a fossil-based economy to a renewable energy economy, the workers aren't left out in the cold.  Speakers will include author, scholar, and energy policy expert Patricia DeMarco and labor historian Charles McCollester.

The 59th salon on Visualizing Air Quality will take place on December 3rd


Salons run 3-10 p.m. at Maren's house in Squirrel Hill.  Please don't arrive before 3 p.m.  We usually aim to start the program sometime around 4, after folks have had a chance to meet, mingle, and tour around an interesting and productive urban permaculture site -- but this time there is no program, so come hang out!.   Please email me (at maren dot cooke at gmail dot com) with salon in the Subject line to RSVP (yes or maybe), or click on the link in your EventBrite invitation (if you're not already on my list, please email me to be added!).  
July's salon with Bill Peduto
Please RSVP each time -- it helps greatly in several ways.  Among other things, attendance varies widely, and these events have been so successful that we need to begin limiting attendance.  So RSVP early if you can, to ensure your participation!  The free virtual "tickets" on Eventbrite may run out (you don't need to print any tickets, by the way, just be on the list).  Also, weather and such can be unpredictable and it's good to know who to contact if there's a change -- and I'll send directions and/or a trail map if you need 'em on Friday or Saturday.  Be sure to include salon in the Subject line, as I receive a ridiculous amount of email every day.  And if you're new, please let me know how you heard about the Salons!
Bring food and/or drink to share if you can, along with musical instruments if you play.  Check back on MarensList (where you can find information on all sorts of environmental and social justice events) for updates.  And if you aren't yet on my list, if you're interested in Sustainability Salons (and our occasional house concert, simply contact me and I'll put you on my email list.  

As always, I'll be sending out directions and such, and any late-breaking info, to all the RSVP'd folks by the morning of the salon if not before.  So if you don't have it yet, please be patient!  One of these days I'll streamline this process a bit, but for now it takes a while to to dot all my i's and cross all my t's.  (All the extraneous requests for the address don't help;  I have lots of other stuff I send out with it, but don't like to let them go unanswered so it adds hours to my prep time.  If you RSVP properly (see above), you should get the info by the morning of the salon!)
For the uninitiated, a Sustainability Salon is an educational forum;  a venue for discussion and debate about important environmental issues;  it's a house party with an environmental theme.  We usually have featured speakers on various aspects of a topic, interspersed with stimulating conversation, lively debate, delectable potluck food and drink, and music-making through the evening.

Past topics have included the City of Pittsburgh's sustainability initiativesfossil energy infrastructure, getting money out of politicscommunity solar power and the Solarize Allegheny program, the Paris climate negotiations (beforeduring, and after), air quality (again, with news on the autism connection), reuse (of things and substances), neighborhood-scale food systems, other forms of green community revitalizationsolar powerclimate changeenvironmental art, environmental education (Part I & Part II), community mapping projectsenvironmental journalismgrassroots actionMarcellus shale development and community rightsgreen buildingair qualityhealth care, more solar powertrees and park stewardshipalternative energy and climate policyregional watershed issues, fantastic film screenings and discussions (often led by filmmakers) over the winter with Rachel Carson and the Power Of One VoiceTriple Divide on fracking, You've Been Trumped and A Dangerous GameA Fierce Green FireSustainability Pioneersfilms on consumptionLiving DownstreamBidder 70YERTGas Rush Stories, and foodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodand more food (a recurrent theme;  with California running out of water, we'd better gear up to produce a lot more of our own!).
Quite a few people have asked me what sorts of food to bring -- and my answer, as always, is whatever inspires you;  I believe in the "luck" part of potlucks.  Tasty noshings for the afternoon, hearty main dishes or scrumptious salads and sides for dinner, baked goods from biscuits and breads to brownies or baklava -- and/or beverages of any kind:  wine, beer, hard or sweet cider (the latter we can mull if you like), juice, tea, whatever.  The more the merrier!  Local fare is always particularly welcome, whether homegrown or boughten.  Dishes containing meat or dairy are fine, though if it isn't really obvious please make a note of it.  

If you haven't been here before, you may enjoy checking out our roof garden and solar installation (and now apiary!) as well as the many other green and interesting things around our place.  

And if you like to make music or listen to homemade music, don't forget the evening sing -- we typically run the gamut from Irish fiddle tunes to protest songs to the Beatles, and a fun time is had by all.  Bring instruments if you play, and/or pick up one of ours.  Conversations will continue through the evening, as well. 

Sep 9 to Oct 9: Re:New Festival

A month-long celebration of creative reuse, transformation, and sustainability featuring workshops, talks, tours, performances, film screenings, and exhibits at venues around Pittsburgh!

More information at http://renewfestival.com

Oct 7 & 8: Reconnect at the Wilkins School Community Center

After a one-year hiatus, WSCC’s fall festival (formerly called Eco-Fest) is returning as Reconnect. The theme of this year’s fair is Reconnecting with Nature through Art.  Because the theme is inspired by the work of Andy Goldsworthy, as portrayed in the beautiful documentary Rivers and Tides, the fair will open on Friday evening, Oct 7, at 7:00 pm, with a free showing of “Rivers and Tides” at WSCC.  The film will be followed by a discussion and a ceremony to connect with Nature as inspiration for our artistic creations for the weekend.
Saturday morning begins with activities for both adults and children. The schedule of events is still being finalized, but we’re anticipating a plant and bulb swap, an art supply swap, kid-friendly artistic/crafty upcycling activities, a gardening lecture, nature walk, the building of a bug hotel, a nature photography workshop and a rechargeable transportation petting zoo. In the afternoon, in the spirit of Goldsworthy, we’ll make an off-site trek to make our own ephemeral installation art using only found nature materials: leaves, rocks, twigs, etc.—an activity that is as much meditation as creation. The kids version will take place at WSCC—building a mandala or Green Man with natural materials.
The day offers an opportunity to enjoy your family, friends, community and outdoors while buying nothing. There will be no trinket giveaways and no admission fees. We will have lovely activities, free events and a chili lunch provided by WSCC members.
This is a great chance to support WSCC with your donations. Start setting aside unused art supplies and plants for the swaps, a mug you no longer love for our Chill the Mug event (Fill it–with your chili—then Chill it—trade it or donate it to Goodwill), and of course any cash you can spare to support WSCC’s building fund. Most importantly, set aside time to join us. 
7-9 p.m. on Friday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday.  If you’d like to help out with the event, please contact wsccvolunteer@gmail.com

Oct 8: Union Edge fundraiser with Mike Stout

Patty DeMarco hosts two half-hour segments each week on The Union Edge- Labor's Talk Radio Station for a program called "Just Transitions- Labor, Environment & Health."  Over the last year, my guests have addressed hazards to fire fighters from flame retardants, fracking sand health effects to workers, lead exposure, pesticide hazards to field workers, the emerging electric micro-grid system, wind power manufacturing, new battery technologies, coal field justice, and many more. This nationwide broadcast addresses the questions in the workforce transition around the health of workers and the health of the environment. But, nothing is free, and I need your support to keep this show on the air!

At The Union Edge, we know how to hold a fundraiser...we have a BIG PARTY!  Join us on October 8th for the release of Mike Stout's newest album "Blue and Green in Black and White" along with a host of performers and lots of food and drinks and a surprise special guest!

8 p.m. at 841 California Avenue, North Side.  RSVP: https://www.theunionedge.com/ or call 412-904-1948

Tickets benefit The Union Edge -- help keep the Voice of Labor ON THE AIR!
Help Patty keep the labor-health-environment connection in the mix with "Just Transitions"

We are all in this together. Come out and show your support for environment and health. Meet your fellow activists
and make new friends in labor, fair trade, LGBT, public banking and fair wage communities.

Oct 8: Permaculture workshop

Learn the basics of creating ecologically healthy urban and suburban landscapes where food and medicine abound.  In this class you'll study the ethics and principles of permaculture as a design science along with some of the most helpful and important practices being used at Garfield Community Farm, an eight year old permaculture experiment on 2.5 acres of abandoned land.  Learn from Garfield Farm's managers, author and educator Darrell Frey and farm director John Creasy.  We'll delve into edible food forest production, plant selection, water management techniques, bioshelter design, garden management and more.  Check out http://garfieldfarm.com/ and follow the farm on Facebook.

9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Garfield Community Farm, on Wicklow St.  Register online ($60) here.

Oct 7-8: Reconnect at the Wilkins School Community Center

After a one-year hiatus, WSCC’s fall festival (formerly called Eco-Fest) is returning as Reconnect. The theme of this year’s fair is Reconnecting with Nature through Art.  Because the theme is inspired by the work of Andy Goldsworthy, as portrayed in the beautiful documentary Rivers and Tides, the fair will open on Friday evening, Oct 7, at 7:00 pm, with a free showing of “Rivers and Tides” at WSCC.  The film will be followed by a discussion and a ceremony to connect with Nature as inspiration for our artistic creations for the weekend.
Saturday morning begins with activities for both adults and children. The schedule of events is still being finalized, but we’re anticipating a plant and bulb swap, an art supply swap, kid-friendly artistic/crafty upcycling activities, a gardening lecture, nature walk, the building of a bug hotel, a nature photography workshop and a rechargeable transportation petting zoo. In the afternoon, in the spirit of Goldsworthy, we’ll make an off-site trek to make our own ephemeral installation art using only found nature materials: leaves, rocks, twigs, etc.—an activity that is as much meditation as creation. The kids version will take place at WSCC—building a mandala or Green Man with natural materials.
The day offers an opportunity to enjoy your family, friends, community and outdoors while buying nothing. There will be no trinket giveaways and no admission fees. We will have lovely activities, free events and a chili lunch provided by WSCC members.
This is a great chance to support WSCC with your donations. Start setting aside unused art supplies and plants for the swaps, a mug you no longer love for our Chill the Mug event (Fill it–with your chili—then Chill it—trade it or donate it to Goodwill), and of course any cash you can spare to support WSCC’s building fund. Most importantly, set aside time to join us. 
7-9 p.m. on Friday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday.  If you’d like to help out with the event, please contact wsccvolunteer@gmail.com

Oct 6: Creating Healthy Communities conference

Dr. Sally Darney, current editor-in-chief of Environmental Health Perspectives at the NIEHS and former director at the EPA, will discuss how built and natural environments impact public health, and steps communities can take to create a more sustainable & healthy region. Health Education and Public Health CEUs available. 

National Keynote Speakers include:

Dr. Marion Nestle is the Paulette Goddard Professor in the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health at New York University, award-winning author, and writer of the blog Food Politics.

Dr. Robert Atkins serves as director of New Jersey Health Initiatives, a statewide grantmaking program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Their programs focus on creating a Culture of Health. 

Dr. Sally Darney is Editor-in-Chief of Environmental Health Perspectives (EHP) published by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). She previously worked for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Dr. Maida Galvez, a board certified Pediatrician at the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, is co-principal investigator and a designated New Investigator of an NIEHS and EPA funded research project entitled "Growing Up Healthy in East Harlem." .
Read the speakers' full bios and register for the conference here: http://bit.ly/2aAVhlx

In addition to national keynotes, local leaders will facilitate breakout sessions/workshops that address regional issues and priorities.

Conference topics will address regional air quality, food access and production, energy, asthma reduction, maternal and child health, transition from old economy to new (green) one, safe housing, and land use and land vacancy as it relates to food and sustainability of a neighborhood.

8:30-4 at the David Lawrence Convention Center.  Registration ($50) at WomenForAHealthyEnvironment.org

This conference is made possible through the generous support of the presenting sponsor Highmark Foundation, the Laurel Foundation, and media sponsor Pittsburgh Magazine.

Oct 1: Sustainability Salon on Environmental Justice


The 57th Sustainability Salon will focus on Environmental Justice: from human health to economics, from the city to the countryside.  Fred Brown, formerly at the Kingsley Association and now head of the Homewood Children's Village, has been one of the major forces behind the green revitalization of Larimer, and is creating ways to improve the future of urban kids in underserved communities.  He was named an 21st Century Environmental Justice Leader by the Ford Foundation.  Environmental and social scientist Kirk Jalbert of the FracTracker Alliance (and a member of the PA DEP's Environmental Justice Advisory Board) is studying how resources and impacts are allocated in the Marcellus shale play and similar regions across the country.  And public health advocate Jill Kriesky, associate director of the Southwest Pennsylvania Environmental Health Project will join us to talk about EHP's Health Registry for areas affected by unconventional oil & gas development.
Since one of the most significant impacts of environmental injustice is on the air people breathe, I wanted to mention Friday's fundraiser for our own effective local air-quality organization, the Group Against Smog & Pollution:  GASP's Night At The Aviary.  A fun time will be had by all!  Also, just prior to this salon, we'll be a featured stop on the sixth annual Pittsburgh Solar Tour, which runs 12-4 p.m. on Saturday.  The 58th salon on the Just Transition will take place on November 12th, and the 59th salon on Visualizing Air Quality will take place on December 3rd.  
Salons run 3-10 p.m. at Maren's house in Squirrel Hill.  Please don't arrive before 3 p.m.  We usually aim to start the program sometime around 4, after folks have had a chance to meet, mingle, and tour around an interesting and productive urban permaculture site -- but this time there is no program, so come hang out!.   Please email me (at maren dot cooke at gmail dot com) with salon in the Subject line to RSVP (yes or maybe), or click on the link in your EventBrite invitation (if you're not already on my list, please email me to be added!).  
July's salon with Bill Peduto
Please RSVP each time -- it helps greatly in several ways.  Among other things, attendance varies widely, and these events have been so successful that we need to begin limiting attendance.  So RSVP early if you can, to ensure your participation!  The free virtual "tickets" on Eventbrite may run out (you don't need to print any tickets, by the way, just be on the list).  Also, weather and such can be unpredictable and it's good to know who to contact if there's a change -- and I'll send directions and/or a trail map if you need 'em on Friday or Saturday.  Be sure to include salon in the Subject line, as I receive a ridiculous amount of email every day.  And if you're new, please let me know how you heard about the Salons!
Bring food and/or drink to share if you can, along with musical instruments if you play.  Check back on MarensList (where you can find information on all sorts of environmental and social justice events) for updates.  And if you aren't yet on my list, if you're interested in Sustainability Salons (and our occasional house concert, simply contact me and I'll put you on my email list.  

As always, I'll be sending out directions and such, and any late-breaking info, to all the RSVP'd folks by the morning of the salon if not before.  So if you don't have it yet, please be patient!  One of these days I'll streamline this process a bit, but for now it takes a while to to dot all my i's and cross all my t's.  (All the extraneous requests for the address don't help;  I have lots of other stuff I send out with it, but don't like to let them go unanswered so it adds hours to my prep time.  If you RSVP properly (see above), you should get the info by the morning of the salon!)
For the uninitiated, a Sustainability Salon is an educational forum;  a venue for discussion and debate about important environmental issues;  it's a house party with an environmental theme.  We usually have featured speakers on various aspects of a topic, interspersed with stimulating conversation, lively debate, delectable potluck food and drink, and music-making through the evening.

Past topics have included the City of Pittsburgh's sustainability initiativesfossil energy infrastructure, getting money out of politicscommunity solar power and the Solarize Allegheny program, the Paris climate negotiations (beforeduring, and after), air quality (again, with news on the autism connection), reuse (of things and substances), neighborhood-scale food systems, other forms of green community revitalizationsolar powerclimate changeenvironmental art, environmental education (Part I & Part II), community mapping projectsenvironmental journalismgrassroots actionMarcellus shale development and community rightsgreen buildingair qualityhealth care, more solar powertrees and park stewardshipalternative energy and climate policyregional watershed issues, fantastic film screenings and discussions (often led by filmmakers) over the winter with Rachel Carson and the Power Of One VoiceTriple Divide on fracking, You've Been Trumped and A Dangerous GameA Fierce Green FireSustainability Pioneersfilms on consumptionLiving DownstreamBidder 70YERTGas Rush Stories, and foodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodand more food (a recurrent theme;  with California running out of water, we'd better gear up to produce a lot more of our own!).
Quite a few people have asked me what sorts of food to bring -- and my answer, as always, is whatever inspires you;  I believe in the "luck" part of potlucks.  Tasty noshings for the afternoon, hearty main dishes or scrumptious salads and sides for dinner, baked goods from biscuits and breads to brownies or baklava -- and/or beverages of any kind:  wine, beer, hard or sweet cider (the latter we can mull if you like), juice, tea, whatever.  The more the merrier!  Local fare is always particularly welcome, whether homegrown or boughten.  Dishes containing meat or dairy are fine, though if it isn't really obvious please make a note of it.  

If you haven't been here before, you may enjoy checking out our roof garden and solar installation (and now apiary!) as well as the many other green and interesting things around our place.  

And if you like to make music or listen to homemade music, don't forget the evening sing -- we typically run the gamut from Irish fiddle tunes to protest songs to the Beatles, and a fun time is had by all.  Bring instruments if you play, and/or pick up one of ours.  Conversations will continue through the evening, as well.