Information bringing people together...


MarensList is Experiencing Technical Difficulties

Due to a change in how this platform works, it has become very difficult to make new postings for future events.  I hope to find a solution soon, but in the meantime my apologies for a rather thin slate of events!  I do consolidate a wide variety of events in each Sustainability Salon listing, so look there for "Other Items of Interest".   There really is a lot going on... note that I also share events on Facebook, so look me up there if you're at loose ends.  

Campfire Dispatch -- current and past issues

The Campfire Dispatch is a newsletter about climate action and climate news in Pennsylvania.  Due to organizational changes, it has moved -- for now, you can view past articles here, and the current issue is here.   

Local food resources

The Putting Down Roots Sustainability Salons have continued each month since February, 2012.  The second Sustainability Salon (as well as the 14th15th, 26th27th, 38th39th, 51st52nd, 62nd, 63rd, 64th, 74th, 75th, 87th88th, 98th, 99th, 110th111th, 122nd, 123rd, 135th, and 136th) focused on food -- growing it, sourcing it locally, and eating more humanely.  Afterwards, Maren put together a list of many such local sources:  CSA farms, farmers' markets, grassfed and humanely raised meats and dairy, natural foods suppliers, bakeries, and advocacy organizations.  This list now resides on a growing Resources section of the Putting Down Roots Blogger site.  Click on the tomatoes to teleport over there! 

Feb 25: Sustainability Salon on Movement-Building (Part IV, Water) on Zoom

A lot of folks are asking "How can I be the most effective?"  "What impact can I have on climate change?" and "How can I contribute to bringing about social justice?"  With 2023 in the books as the hottest year on record -- the world is changing, folks! -- we'll continue our Movement-Building series with a focus on water campaigns.  This will be a great opportunity to get a handle on all the important work being done to protect our region's waterways.  (We'll be on Zoom;  with covid numbers high again, we just don't want 50-100 people in our living room.)

On the macro level, what makes a successful social movement?  How do they develop, from the ground up?  How can groups collaborate most efficiently?  How best to target our efforts?  What skills are needed?  What kind of strategic planning is necessary, at what stages?  On the personal level: what do you care about?  What are you good at?  What do you love doing?  What do you know?  Who do you know?  We can use the answers to all these questions to plan, create, and sustain effective campaigns -- not just a protest march here, a banner-drop there.   

For the 145th Sustainability Salon (kicking off our 13th year of salons!), we'll continue our exploration of these ideas, as we figure out how to use our passion to create long-term campaigns.  In October, longtime activist and skilled movement trainers Penn Garvin and Kidest Gebre led an interactive workshop (you can view the recording online, if you weren't able to attend!) and this time we'll be considering some of the long-term campaigns helping to protect water quality that are active in our region.  We'll brainstorm ways to improve these campaigns, and share stories, insights, resources, and victories -- as well as finding ways to connect more folks with this important work.  We hope that a lot of local leaders, activists, and would-be activists will be able to join us for this series -- and are looking for  Again, if you couldn't make the first one but want to join in the discussion, please view the recording online -- that'll help get us all onto the same page, laying the groundwork for our discussions with particular regional campaigns.   Documents and links associated with this series are provided here.  Two previous salons in this series focused on Air and Climate campaigns.  

Penn Garvin will be with us again, to frame our conversation.  Penn began her activist work with the original Poor People's Campaign in 1968, following the assassination of Martin Luther King.  She has worked on issues like human rights, women's health care, homelessness, Central America, peace, and the environment -- and has led workshops on organizing and non-violent civil resistance.  She presently works with Pennsylvania Action On Climate.  

Robin Martin Lesko, organizer at Food & Water Watch, led a successful canvassing campaign to protect Allegheny County parks from fracking.  

Heather Hulton VanTassel is the executive director of Three Rivers Waterkeeper, which monitors and protects the Allegheny, the Monongahela, and the Ohio using science and the law.

Tom Pike, environmental policy advocate at ProtectPT, will share their work protecting water quality from fracking and related operations in Allegheny and Westmoreland Counties.

Hilary Flint is Director of Communications and Community Engagement for Beaver County Marcellus Awareness Community (BCMAC), and Vice President of Unity Council for the East Palestine Train Derailment.  As a cancer survivor and affected resident, she’s determined to protect others from corporate greed and the health harms generated by the buildout of petrochemical plastics manufacturing. 

Check back here for updates!

The next Sustainability Salon will very likely launch our regular spring series on Food.

There are also a whole lot of other important events happening in our region;  check out the list below!
With winter here, we'll be on Zoom for the next several months.  Zoom salons (and the Zoom side for hybrid events), start around 4 p.m., when presentations begin, and usually wind down sometime around 7 or 8 (informal discussion may continue after that -- join us for whatever time works for you!).   If you're not already on my Eventbrite list, please email me (maren dot cooke at gmail dot com) with "salon" in the Subject line to be added -- and let me know how you heard about salons!  If you RSVP via Eventbriteyou'll receive the Zoom registration link right away. Along about Saturday night/Sunday morning, I'll send it out again, with other information, to all who have RSVP'd.  If you're new to Zoom, you may find my Zoom Reference Guide helpful

Other events and whatnot:

•  Feb 9:  Collective Knowledge Building Workshop on Air Quality & Community Health (2:30-4:30 p.m. at General Sisters, 1140 Kirkpatrick Ave. in North Braddock). 

•  Feb 15:  The Black Appalachian Coalition and the Ohio River Valley Institute are partnering with  Patricia DeMarco, PhD for a Petrochemical Lunch & Learn series, delving deep into the connection between environmental pollution and our health.  Register here.

•  Feb 17:   Join the Pittsburgh Branch of DarkSky International and other local folks who care about light pollution in Pittsburgh to socialize and share stories, enjoy light refreshments, and tour the Allegheny Observatory!  Registration requested (and note that if there's inclement weather, it'll shift to Zoom).

•  Feb 22:   Join national and local Green New Deal networks, congressmember Summer Lee, and other voices for a community event and rally calling on President Biden and our Pennsylvania state government to make bigger and bolder investments that keep our communities safe and healthy (vs. more spending on waging war).  2-3 p.m. in Schenley Plaza -- more information and registration here

•  Mar 2:  Poor People's Campaign Mass Mobilization in Harrisburg -- more information and registration here.  There will be a bus from Pittsburgh!

•  Mar 9:  Want to know more about the trees in your neighborhood, and have the opportunity to help care for them?  Become a Tree Tender!  Tree Pittsburgh and Upstream Pgh are holding a training in Wilkinsburg -- more info and registration here.

•  ReImagine Food Systems, which we've talked about at past salons, is raising funds for this year's operations (food gardens and hands-on education offered at no cost to residents in environmental justice communities, by volunteers).  If you have something to spare, you can contribute via GoFundMe.

•  Concerned Health Professionals of NY recently released the 9th Edition of the Compendium of Scientific, Medical, and Media Findings Demonstrating Risks and Harms of Fracking and Associated Gas & Oil Infrastructure.  Check it out!  

•  PA is considering legislation to (a) greatly increase the renewables portion of our electricity generation, and (b) enable community solar!!  The Pennsylvania Solar Center has made it easy to speak out to support this action

•  We know that only a tiny fraction of plastic has ever been recycled.  And yet, NPR has been airing sponsorship messages for the American Recycling Council, which is continuing to perpetrate the "recycling" hoax.  Does that make your blood boil?  The national group Beyond Plastics has a petition/sign-on letter to get them to stop -- please sign, for yourself or for an organization you represent!

•  It's been more than a year now!  You can support striking Post-Gazette workers here (and consider signing up for the alternative online publication, the Pittsburgh Union Progress -- and maybe even cancel your P-G subscription until they start treating workers fairly!).  This strike has garnered national attention;  one recent picket even made it into Teen Vogue.

•  And speaking of solidarity, the Cop City controversy is still raging in Atlanta.  More information and a support fund are here.  There's also talk of a similar facility in the works for Pittsburgh.

•  Another forest that needs protecting is Sherwood Forest, in Mason Co., WA -- at risk of clear-cutting by a company headquartered here in Pittsburgh.  You can learn more (and donate to the legal fund if you can) here

•  PRC continues to hold online workshops about composting, rainwater harvesting, and waste reduction.  

•  The Rachel Carson EcoVillage is still looking for a few more members, so they can start construction!  Curious?  Check out this introductory video -- or even better, sign up for an introduction session or sign up as an “inquirer” to have more information sent to you.

•  Did you see the film The Story of Plastic, or the PBS doc Plastic Wars?  (and/or join us for Plastic Paradise at a winter film salon six years ago?)  ...What if you could bring up imagery of the toxic impacts of plastic production, and commentary by the people and communities living with them, over the world?  You can do all that with the interactive Toxic Tours tool.  Check it out!  

•  Mask update:  Breathe99 masks (featured in a 2020 salon on Pandemics and Air (video), and one of TIME's 100 Best Inventions of 2020) are now being distributed by Our Children Our Earth, a local purveyor of alternatives to disposables (as well as classy wooden toys).  Contact Dianne via OCOE's Facebook page, or call (412) 772-1638 to coordinate a curbside pickup (or you can still order online).
For the uninitiated, a Sustainability Salon is an educational forum;  it's a mini-conference;  it's a venue for discussion and debate about important environmental issues (and often health, and justice, and politics);  it's a house party (if there weren't a pandemic) with an environmental theme.  Each month we have featured speakers on various aspects of a particular topic, interspersed with stimulating conversation, lively debate, and (when in person) delectable potluck food and drink and music-making through the evening.   Originally a potluck mini-conference, the event has been mostly on Zoom since March 2020, except for some outdoor summer (and now hybrid!) salons.  
Past topics have included climate campaignsconsumerism, air quality campaigns movement-building and sustained campaignsabandoned oil and gas wellshope (finding it, creating it, using it), addressing environmental causes of cancera development proposal for Frick Park, single-use plastic legislationhome energy efficiency (and legislation to help fund improvements)the UN's COP process for climate negotiationsalternatives to single-use packaging, our region's air (part I and part II), activist art and America's Energy Gambleadvocacy opportunitiessocial justice gamesfixing Pennsylvania state governmentclimate actionforest restorationthe history of American consumerismregional air qualitypreserving Pittsburgh's forests, climate modelingapproaches to pipelinespipeline hazardsthe legacy of the Fukushima nuclear disasterthe judiciary and fair electionsconsumptionpandemics and air,  election law and activismair quality and environmental justicesocial investment,  local economies, the economics of energymutual aid networksocean healththe rise of the radical rightthe back end of consumptionapproaches to activism on fracking & climateair quality, technology, and citizen sciencesingle-use plasticselection activismelection law, whether to preserve existing nuclear power plantsadvanced nuclear technologiespassenger and freight trainsconsumption, plastics, and pollutionair qualitysolar poweryouth activismgreening businessgreenwashing, the petrochemical buildout in our region, climate/nature/peoplefracking, health, & actionglobalizationecological ethicscommunity inclusionair quality monitoringinformal gatherings that turn out to have lots of speakersgetting STEM into Congresskeeping Pittsburgh's water publicShell's planned petrochemical plantvisualizing air quality, the City of Pittsburgh's sustainability initiativesfossil energy infrastructure, getting money out of politicscommunity solar power and the Solarize Allegheny program, the Paris climate negotiations (beforeduring, and after), air quality (again, with news on the autism connection), reuse (of things and substances), neighborhood-scale food systems, other forms of green community revitalizationsolar powerclimate changeenvironmental art, environmental education (Part I & Part II), community mapping projectsenvironmental journalismgrassroots actionMarcellus shale development and community rightsgreen buildingair qualityhealth care, more solar powertrees and park stewardshipalternative energy and climate policyregional watershed issues, fantastic film screenings and discussions (often led by filmmakers) over the winter with films on Food SystemsClimate Adaptation and MitigationPlastic Paradise, Rachel Carson and the Power Of One VoiceTriple Divide on fracking, You've Been Trumped and A Dangerous GameA Fierce Green FireSustainability Pioneersfilms on consumptionLiving DownstreamBidder 70YERTGas Rush Stories, and foodfoodfoodfoodfoodfood, food, foodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodand more food (a recurrent theme;  with California running out of water, we'd better gear up to produce a lot more of our own!).

 









Jan 21: Sustainability Salon on Movement-Building (Part III, Climate (zoom))

A lot of folks are asking "How can I be the most effective?"  "What impact can I have on climate change?" and "How can I contribute to bringing about social justice?"  With 2023 in the books as the hottest year on record, we'll start 2024 with a focus on climate change activism.  This will be a great opportunity to get a handle on all the important work being done in our region to spur climate action.  We'll be on Zoom again;  with covid numbers high again, we just don't want 50-100 people in our living room.

On the macro level, what makes a successful social movement?  How do they develop, from the ground up?  How can groups collaborate most efficiently?  How best to target our efforts?  What skills are needed?  What kind of strategic planning is necessary, at what stages?  On the personal level: what do you care about?  What are you good at?  What do you love doing?  What do you know?  Who do you know?  We can use the answers to all these questions to plan, create, and sustain effective campaigns -- not just a protest march here, a banner-drop there.   

For the 144th Sustainability Salon (that's TWELVE YEARS of Salons!), we'll continue our exploration of these ideas, as we figure out how to use our passion to create long-term campaigns.  In October, longtime activist and skilled movement trainers Penn Garvin and Kidest Gebre led an interactive workshop (you can view the recording online, if you weren't able to attend!) and this time we'll be considering some of the long-term campaigns around climate that are active in our region.  We'll brainstorm ways to improve them, and share stories, insights, resources, and victories -- as well as finding ways to connect more folks with this important work.  We hope that a lot of local leaders, activists, and would-be activists will be able to join us for this series -- and are looking for  Again, if you couldn't make the first one but want to join in the discussion, please view the recording online -- that'll help get us all onto the same page, laying the groundwork for our discussions with particular regional campaigns.   Documents and links associated with this series are provided here.

Penn Garvin will be with us again, to frame our conversation.  Penn began her activist work with the original Poor People's Campaign in 1968, following the assassination of Martin Luther King.  She has worked on issues like human rights, women's health care, homelessness, Central America, peace, and the environment -- and has led workshops on organizing and non-violent civil resistance.  She presently works with Pennsylvania Action On Climate (PAC), and others from PAC will join the conversation.

Matthew Mehalik, executive director of the Breathe Project, will be with us again, this time with a brief history of climate activism in our region.

This salon will be part of the leadup to the launch of 350 Pittsburgh's new University Environmental Scorecard, and we'll hear about 350Pgh's other long-term campaigns, from 350 Pgh's Jim Blakley.

After 350.org, Bill McKibben went on to found Third Act, harnessing the considerable energies of "experienced Americans" (folks over 60) to protect people and the planet, now and into the future.  A Pennsylvania working group has formed and is advocating for stronger climate action in PA, protecting the right to vote and uplifting democracy, and helping people (and pressuring institutions) to divest from fossil fuels. Local organizers JoAnn Karsh and Marty Seltman will share an update on the group's work so far.

Younger generations, of course, are going to have to contend with climate impacts on into the future.  And young folks are speaking out and acting up, through groups like the Sunrise MovementFossil Free Pitt Coalition, and CMU's Sustainable Earth  Pittsburgh Youth for Climate Action grew out of the work of Communitopia with local students;  Raina Rippel, executive director of Communitopia, will shine a light on their work.

On the legislative front, Citizens Climate Lobby has long advocated for carbon fee and dividend bills that would use natural market forces to incentivize conservation and renewables.  Dana Siler, co-chair of the Pittsburgh chapter, will talk about some of the tools in CCL's toolbox including letters and op-eds in newspapers and public speaking as well as direct lobbying.  

Pittsburgh Green New Deal is also working on strategies to help make sure that the Climate Action Plan being developed for Allegheny County centers environmental justice (including economic, racial, disability, and migrant justice) while being accountable, transparent, and enforceable.  Core members Helen Gerhardt and Julia Mente will talk about this and other PGND campaigns.

Pennsylvania Action on Climate takes a strong stance against corruption leading to environmental devastation in Pennsylvania.   PAC co-founder Michael Bagdes-Canning will share their experiences doing non-violent direct action around the state and in Harrisburg.

Climate action will require understanding and participation from everyone.  But it can be a challenge to have a meaningful conversation about climate change with folks on the other side of the political divide.  The Climate and Rural Systems Partnership, based at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History and the University of Pittsburgh, is a collaborative learning and research project aiming to get people in rural Western Pennsylvania talking about it -- and ready to make necessary changes.  Alexis Boytim, senior program manager, will share their progress.  (CRSP is a follow-on to CUSP, the Climate Urban Systems Partnership, which we featured at a 2013 salon.)

The next Sustainability Salon will very likely be another installment in this series, looking at water -- check back on MarensList for the latest!  

There are also a whole lot of other important events happening in our region;  check out the list below!
With autumn closing in, we'll be on Zoom for the next several months.  Zoom salons (and the Zoom side for hybrid events), start around 4 p.m., when presentations begin, and usually wind down sometime around 7 or 8 (informal discussion may continue after that -- join us for whatever time works for you!).   If you're not already on my Eventbrite list, please email me (maren dot cooke at gmail dot com) with "salon" in the Subject line to be added -- and let me know how you heard about salons!  If you RSVP via Eventbrite, you'll receive the Zoom registration link right away. Along about Saturday night/Sunday morning, I'll send it out again, with other information, to all who have RSVP'd.  If you're new to Zoom, you may find my Zoom Reference Guide helpful

Other events and whatnot:

•  Jan 9:   The Order of the Phoenix, Pittsburgh Democratic Committee, Indivisible Grassroots Pittsburgh, 14th Ward Independent Democratic Club, and Indivisible Forest Hills host a Town Hall with Mayor Ed Gainey (7 p.m. at First Unitarian Church in Shadyside).  

•  Jan 14:   First in a series of strategic planning sessions to promote, improve, and advocate for Climate Action Plans and environmental justice across the Pittsburgh region.  More information and registration here.

•  Jan 18 or 19 (your choice):  Introductory webinar for the 58th cohort of the ROCIS (Reducing Outdoor Contaminants in Indoor Spaces) monitoring project.  Now virtual (and even open to some folks outside of swpa) and free to participate!  Learn more and register here

•  Jan 18 - Mar 14:  Once again, Farm to Table presents a series of online gardening classes with local gardening sage Doug Oster.  Thursdays at 5pm on Zoom -- more info and registration here.

•  Jan 19-20:  The annual Pittsburgh Racial Justice Summit (Friday evening keynote and daytime workshops on Saturday, at the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary).   Lots more information and registration hereNEWSFLASH:  Postponed, due to snow and illnesses.  

•  Jan 25:  ReImagine TCWAC is having another visioning session!  Learn about the group's initiatives (including ReImagine Food Systems, which we've talked about at past salons), and connect with local climate and envl organizations.  More info and registration here.  (Note:  tabling space still available for orgs!)

•  Jan 30:  GASP continues to Make the Connections with a panel discussion on home health hazards.  More information and registration here.

•  Jan 31:  Ohio Valley Environmental Advocates kicks off an Expert Series with a webinar on local air monitoring and the impacts of cumulative air pollution (7 p.m. on Zoom).  Register here.

•  Feb 15:  The Black Appalachian Coalition and the Ohio River Valley Institute are partnering with  Patricia DeMarco, PhD for a Petrochemical Lunch & Learn series, delving deep into the connection between environmental pollution and our health.  Register here.

•  ReImagine Food Systems, which we've talked about at past salons, is raising funds for this year's operations (food gardens and hands-on education offered at no cost to residents in environmental justice communities, by volunteers).  If you have something to spare, you can contribute via GoFundMe.

•  Concerned Health Professionals of NY recently released the 9th Edition of the Compendium of Scientific, Medical, and Media Findings Demonstrating Risks and Harms of Fracking and Associated Gas & Oil Infrastructure.  Check it out!  

•  PA is considering legislation to (a) greatly increase the renewables portion of our electricity generation, and (b) enable community solar!!  The Pennsylvania Solar Center has made it easy to speak out to support this action

•  We know that only a tiny fraction of plastic has ever been recycled.  And yet, NPR has been airing sponsorship messages for the American Recycling Council, which is continuing to perpetrate the "recycling" hoax.  Does that make your blood boil?  The national group Beyond Plastics has a petition/sign-on letter to get them to stop -- please sign, for yourself or for an organization you represent!

•  It's been more than a year now!  You can support striking Post-Gazette workers here (and consider signing up for the alternative online publication, the Pittsburgh Union Progress -- and maybe even cancel your P-G subscription until they start treating workers fairly!).  This strike has garnered national attention;  one recent picket even made it into Teen Vogue.

•  And speaking of solidarity, the Cop City controversy is still raging in Atlanta.  More information and a support fund are here.  There's also talk of a similar facility in the works for Pittsburgh.

•  Another forest that needs protecting is Sherwood Forest, in Mason Co., WA -- at risk of clear-cutting by a company headquartered here in Pittsburgh.  You can learn more (and donate to the legal fund if you can) here

•  PRC continues to hold online workshops about composting, rainwater harvesting, and waste reduction.  

•  The Rachel Carson EcoVillage is still looking for a few more members, so they can start construction!  Curious?  Check out this introductory video -- or even better, sign up for an introduction session or sign up as an “inquirer” to have more information sent to you.

•  Did you see the film The Story of Plastic, or the PBS doc Plastic Wars?  (and/or join us for Plastic Paradise at a winter film salon six years ago?)  ...What if you could bring up imagery of the toxic impacts of plastic production, and commentary by the people and communities living with them, over the world?  You can do all that with the interactive Toxic Tours tool.  Check it out!  

•  Mask update:  Breathe99 masks (featured in a 2020 salon on Pandemics and Air (video), and one of TIME's 100 Best Inventions of 2020) are now being distributed by Our Children Our Earth, a local purveyor of alternatives to disposables (as well as classy wooden toys).  Contact Dianne via OCOE's Facebook page, or call (412) 772-1638 to coordinate a curbside pickup (or you can still order online).
For the uninitiated, a Sustainability Salon is an educational forum;  it's a mini-conference;  it's a venue for discussion and debate about important environmental issues (and often health, and justice, and politics);  it's a house party (if there weren't a pandemic) with an environmental theme.  Each month we have featured speakers on various aspects of a particular topic, interspersed with stimulating conversation, lively debate, and (when in person) delectable potluck food and drink and music-making through the evening.   Originally a potluck mini-conference, the event has been mostly on Zoom since March 2020, except for some outdoor summer (and now hybrid!) salons.  
Past topics have included consumerism, air quality campaigns movement-building and sustained campaignsabandoned oil and gas wellshope (finding it, creating it, using it), addressing environmental causes of cancera development proposal for Frick Park, single-use plastic legislationhome energy efficiency (and legislation to help fund improvements)the UN's COP process for climate negotiationsalternatives to single-use packaging, our region's air (part I and part II), activist art and America's Energy Gambleadvocacy opportunitiessocial justice gamesfixing Pennsylvania state governmentclimate actionforest restorationthe history of American consumerismregional air qualitypreserving Pittsburgh's forests, climate modelingapproaches to pipelinespipeline hazardsthe legacy of the Fukushima nuclear disasterthe judiciary and fair electionsconsumptionpandemics and air,  election law and activismair quality and environmental justicesocial investment,  local economies, the economics of energymutual aid networksocean healththe rise of the radical rightthe back end of consumptionapproaches to activism on fracking & climateair quality, technology, and citizen sciencesingle-use plasticselection activismelection law, whether to preserve existing nuclear power plantsadvanced nuclear technologiespassenger and freight trainsconsumption, plastics, and pollutionair qualitysolar poweryouth activismgreening businessgreenwashing, the petrochemical buildout in our region, climate/nature/peoplefracking, health, & actionglobalizationecological ethicscommunity inclusionair quality monitoringinformal gatherings that turn out to have lots of speakersgetting STEM into Congresskeeping Pittsburgh's water publicShell's planned petrochemical plantvisualizing air quality, the City of Pittsburgh's sustainability initiativesfossil energy infrastructure, getting money out of politicscommunity solar power and the Solarize Allegheny program, the Paris climate negotiations (beforeduring, and after), air quality (again, with news on the autism connection), reuse (of things and substances), neighborhood-scale food systems, other forms of green community revitalizationsolar powerclimate changeenvironmental art, environmental education (Part I & Part II), community mapping projectsenvironmental journalismgrassroots actionMarcellus shale development and community rightsgreen buildingair qualityhealth care, more solar powertrees and park stewardshipalternative energy and climate policyregional watershed issues, fantastic film screenings and discussions (often led by filmmakers) over the winter with films on Food SystemsClimate Adaptation and MitigationPlastic Paradise, Rachel Carson and the Power Of One VoiceTriple Divide on fracking, You've Been Trumped and A Dangerous GameA Fierce Green FireSustainability Pioneersfilms on consumptionLiving DownstreamBidder 70YERTGas Rush Stories, and foodfoodfoodfoodfoodfood, food, foodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodfoodand more food (a recurrent theme;  with California running out of water, we'd better gear up to produce a lot more of our own!).